Just as with nearly everything else, there are myths circulating about lightweight, flat panel Plasma TV screens.

Understanding the myth of plasma screens and high altitudes has to do with knowing that plasma screens were developed to perform their best located near or at sea level altitudes. Therefore, it makes sense that a plasma TV would have to work harder at higher altitudes to compensate for the difference of exterior pressure.

This compensation results in the generation of heat, which in turn turns on the screens built in cooling fans, which may or may not be included in any particular system. If the Plasma TV screen has cooling fans, they usually transmit a reverberated hum. Hearing a definite buzzing sound signals that the plasma TV does have cooling fans. It is also understandable that the life span of a plasma TV be to some extent shortened.

However, some plasma TVs shows resilience in running at paramount condition of up to 5000 feet, which is pretty good. Technology works every hour developing new innovations for our use. If they can hang Plasma TV’s on the wall, they’ll soon be hanging Plasma TV’s on the walls atop mountains.

Talk with your local dealer over information concerning high altitudes, and be open to buying an LCD or DLP with thin flat screen panels, if there isn’t an available plasma TV for your location. Remember the more an item is requested, the more likely the demand for that item will be satisfied. Your local plasma TV dealer would have the most up to date information concerning these and other issues, so be sure to ask.

Understanding the myth of leaking plasma TV’s, has to do with knowing that it is not possible for gas to leak from its sealed pixel celled structure. Each element of the plasma screen is separate from the others by being sealed as well as the changing plates are sealed. When an unusual amount of pixel space of the screen display goes dark it is not possible to just fill it up again. Plasma gas does not refill, the complete panel should be replaced.

Understanding the myth of Plasma TV’s adaptability with an old VCR has to do with knowing that made for consumer use plasma TV are adaptable with an old VCR which has a component video outputs, AV and S-Video. Unfortunately, VHS is to slow in resolution with an inconsistent and poor color quality for entertaining pleasure on a Plasma TV.

Understanding the myth of Mercury poisoning has to do with knowing that you are more likely to come in contact by eating fish with traces of mercury weekly, than to have a reaction to a scant amount of container filled mercury of a TV viewing screen.

Understanding the myth of energy use has to do with knowing that studies show that the energy use of both the Plasma and LCD TV’s function more or less the same.

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